FRESCO - A NEW - OLD TECHNIQUE

If we Need to ship a fresco we cannot ship the fresco with the wall attached to it.  So we follow the following technique:

The Calicot method / strappo ( recognized by the Superintendence of Fine Arts for restoring ancient works) is shown below. All of the items on this web site were first painted on a stone / masonry wall on fresh plaster and then removed from the wall using the above technique. The only difference is that after we remove the fresco, instead of gluing it back to the wall we glue it to a canvas frame it and sell it as a panel painting.

Fresco painting

Fresco painting is a very old technique. It reached the height of splendor with the Renaissance masters and was used to decorate buildings and church vaults. A fresco is painted on fresh (fresco) plaster made of slaked lime and sieved siliceous river sand plus pigments diluted with plain water. The painting must be done quickly and surely, before the base has time to dry. (Murals are instead painted over dry plaster). The chemical reaction between the calcium hydrate and carbonic acid in the atmosphere fixes the painting and makes it insoluble. This technique was used to decorate buildings and church vaults.


Above: Sergio Bonometti applying the fresch plaster to his studio wall

The Calicot method / strappo ( recognized by the Superintendence of Fine Arts for restoring ancient works) : Through the centuries as the buildings were demolished,  whether by man or natural causes, the works were saved by removing the frescoes from the original walls and transferring them to other bases using canvas and animal glue. Some frescoes are several hundred years old. When the plaster behind the fresco deteriorates the fresco needs to be removed from the wall, the plaster must be fixed and then the fresco must be glued back to the original wall.

Our method for panel frescoes: Actually our method does not differ from the classical fresco method ? All of the items on this web site were first painted on a stone wall on fresh plaster and then removed from the wall using the above technique (calicot method). The only difference is that after we remove the fresco, instead of gluing it back to the wall we glue it to a canvas frame it and sell it as a panel painting.

Why we do not paint directly on the canvas:

Plaster does not stick to canvas so in order to 'make it stick' we would have to mix solvent and/or glues. The addition of these substances changes the appearance. To maintain the look as close to the original as possible, we use the Calicot method by removing the fresco from the stone wall and gluing on the canvas. Also this method allow us to use just the pigment of the colors mixed with sand.  In substance if you like the antique look this is the best way to go.


Above: Sergio Bonometti making a drawing of the future fresco painting

Why portable (Panel) Fresco :

The fresco look is very different than oil paintings or murals. Frescoes do not have colors as bright as a mural. Anyone who has visited Italy and Europe in general will notice immediately the difference between (for example) a Mexican mural (or an oil painting) and a fresco. If you want a room that will make you 'feel' like you are in Italy this style of painting is probably what you are looking for. If this look is what you want then buying one or two of our frescoes is an inexpensive solution - hang them in your room and they will give you the look and feel of Italy. It is cheaper than flying Sergio and Giovanni to your place and feeding them for a week for example! Also you might move after a few years and having a fresco panel will allow you to take it to your new place.

ALL the frescoes on this web site are painted by Sergio Bonometti or his art center . The fresco technique gives our items soft colors and the same look as frescoes painted hundreds and thousands of years ago. (Unfortunately, computers cannot reproduce this look accurately so the above items may appear to resemble paintings).


Above: Sergio Bonometti making a coloring the fresco

Art director

After graduating from the Caravaggio Art School in Brescia, Sergio Bonometti attended The Brera Academy of fine arts in Milan for Several years. There he honed his artistic Skills working alongside famous fresco Painters renovating decorating palaces, Villas and large hotels. Sergio Bonometti's twenty years experience And artistic qualities enable Italian Frescoes.  To turn out top quality works to enhance the Furnishing of stylish homes and other Settings. Italian Frescoes / Lifeinitaly guarantees that our Fresco are made in Italy using the above Techniques only.